How Often Should The Pricing Committee Be Meeting And Making Changes?

From PriceIntelligently
Quote in SaaS & Tech Growth Strategy

Once you have your pricing committee in place, they should be making minor changes to your pricing strategy every quarter and major changes to your pricing strategy every six months, regardless of the size of your organization. In reality, given organizational size, larger organizations may move a bit slower and smaller organizations a bit quicker, but this cadence is exceptionally important, because this is how quickly almost every vertical in SaaS is moving.

Every 3 months make small tweaks that don’t require major customer communication

At the end of every quarter you should be evaluating your pricing strategy’s performance based on goals you’ve set as an organization (improving LTV/CAC, increasing QoQ growth, etc.). You should also be analysing your main pricing metrics (value metric, price level, feature packaging, etc) by pulling or collecting necessary data.

The three month cadence allows you to constantly be re-evaluating where you stand in the market and how your customers are changing. Yet, even with wide data swings, you’ll likely not make major changes every three months, because customers would be placed into too volatile of a pricing environment. This is why we recommend making minor changes that mainly impact your upgrade and downgrade rates to keep your pricing momentum, but to not have to communicate to the whole of your customer base.

What are “minor” pricing changes? Here’s a good list:

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