Statistic Info

When Emily Amanatullah was a graduate student studying management, she couldn’t help noticing that a lot of the classic advice in the field was aimed more at men than women. Negotiation tactics in particular seemed tougher for women to master.

“You realize they’re pretty at odds with how women comport themselves and how they’re expected to comport themselves,” she says.

She started to talk to other women and to examine her own behavior. All the women she spoke to said they hated advocating for themselves at work. But they had no trouble speaking up for colleagues.

So Amanatullah, now an assistant professor of management at the University of Texas, devised an experiment. In a simulation, she had men and women negotiate a starting salary for themselves. Then she had them negotiate on behalf of someone else.

When the women negotiated for themselves, they asked for an average of $7,000 less than the men. But when they negotiated on behalf of a friend, they asked for just as much money as the men.

Amanatullah says when women advocate for themselves, they have to navigate more than a higher salary: They’re managing their reputation, too. Women worry that pushing for more money will damage their image. Research shows they’re right to be concerned: Both male and female managers are less likely to want to work with women who negotiate during a job interview.

July 11, 2019 Seminar

Marketing Uncovered: Market Research & Assessments To Win

Know Where You Stand To Reach Your Destination This seminar will give you a step-by-step approach to gathering information from prospects, assessing your current marketing, and evaluating competitors. These elements are key to creating a plan for successful marketing and we’ll be giving you a unique insight into how to get it done. During this […]


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